The Absence of the Arts. . . and School Boredom

Different approach to the question/issue of the decline of the arts in K12 schools. . .

School: It’s Way More Boring Than When You Were There

Advertisements

About jchall1960

I'm the instructor for FA 200, Introduction to the Arts at the University of Alabama
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to The Absence of the Arts. . . and School Boredom

  1. klfoto says:

    This article is so interesting and yet so frustrating to me. The amount of time mandated for educational purposes is so controversial. We are living in a world where we are competing with fast pace nations like Japan and China, who go to school far beyond 200 days a year, whereas we, in the United States, are only going 180 days. Their scores are higher, and Americans feel the need to compete to beat them. We are eliminating “not as important” subjects from school curriculum, and enforcing more time spent on the core subjects, like math and science. I think this is a bad idea, because it leads more students to drop out. Kids in elementary schools where recess is no longer an option are quite bored going to school. They have nothing to look forward to during the school day anymore. Higher drop out rates are only one reason why I feel this way. There are several more bad outcomes of making schools become more strict and less well-rounded.

  2. srlewis3 says:

    This article has a great point. My high school, which is in the Black Belt Community so it is mainly of people from low income families, is facing the same problems. Things have even gotten worse since I left. The students there now have to spend an extra twenty minutes in school and every single one of the electives have been taken out of the cirriculum except keyboarding. The changes are also happening in the elementary school that I attended. My brother goes there now and he complains that he never get the chance to play. Mom says that he comes home and goes straight to sleep from exhaustion. He is only in Pre-K. I mean, sure an extra math class would be great to help students prepare for college, but I’m pretty sure previous members of the school board had great reasons to put in breaks and extra ciricular activities in the first place. Why take it out now?

  3. sbusby2015 says:

    This post related SO much to what my school is like. i attended a K-12 school so I saw first hand how the school changed over the years as they cut out things throughout the school system. In our county we were the least important school around, therefore we were the ones to always catch the cuts. When I was going through elementary school we would have a certain time everyday for band, where we learned about music and people who played music, and even learned songs. We had recess where we were let out to play for thirty minutes. As a kid you expect that little bit of time to relax, have play time, and learn about something interesting besides math and writing. Well shortly after I was out of elementary school, and my little brother started the cuts began. It disappointed me to see my little brother not being able to learn about music and art, and being able to have that half hour of recess to just relax and play. Now during my senior year music was almost completely cut out, recess was no longer play it was just straight exercise. Kids have no down time anymore and all they learn are the things they will be tested on. I can honestly tell you I don’t know the last time I was truly taught history. It is a sad but true statement that the school systems are cutting out what they think to be non-important, but the things kids are needing more in the future.

  4. Nure Kassas says:

    I went to an American high school in the Middle East, and there wasn’t enough money to have arts classes like music, drama, or drawing. Universities in the Middle East place great emphasis on GPA, and universities in the United States stress the importance of standardized tests like the SAT and ACT. As a result, core subjects like math, science, and English took precedence. This is unfortunate because there are students who excel in the arts, but have difficulties with these core subjects, and they never get a chance to shine because a lack of arts classes. I do think that there is a possible solution to this problem. I think the arts need to be incorporated in the core classes. For example, in classes such as history, the teacher can have the students act out historical scenes to make the class more interesting– it would also give students who are interested in the arts a chance to express themselves. In my high school, we had a history fair- “Night of the Notables” – where we all got to dress up as historical figures and then act out our characters in front of an audience. It was a lot of fun for the students. I do think that by incorporating arts into the core classes like science, math, and history, schools can at least somewhat bridge the gap between the arts and the more “standard” education.

  5. srlewis3 says:

    This article has a great point. My high school, which is in the Black Belt Community so it is mainly of people from low income families, is facing the same problems. Things have even gotten worse since I left. The students there now have to spend an extra twenty minutes in school and every single one of the electives have been taken out of the cirriculum except keyboarding. The changes are also happening in the elementary school that I attended. My brother goes there now and he complains that he never get the chance to play. Mom says that he comes home and goes straight to sleep from exhaustion. He is only in Pre-K. I mean, sure an extra math class would be great to help students prepare for college, but I’m pretty sure previous members of the school board had great reasons to put in breaks and extra ciricular activities in the first place. Why take it out now?

  6. wnichols1993 says:

    Some students do view school as boring but dance, music, films, painting to students is not! The arts need to stay in the school to keep the energy and motivation alive!

  7. agaron1993 says:

    I absolutely agree that arts add something fun for students instead of all the boring everyday subjects. As someone who struggled with courses like Math and Science, the few art and creative writing classes at my high school were a welcome repreive from the monotony of computing numbers and memorizing facts. I understand that having a strong math and science program is important, but I don’t think it is worth sacrificing the entire arts department as many schools are doing. Going back to what Daniel Pink said in his video at the start of this course, it is important to be a well rounded individual and the arts are definitely making a comeback.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s